President Throws Down “Last-Ditch” Gauntlet

June 19, 2010

Okay . . . most of us are in our 50’s.  I know that in the last 3 years I have actually felt my age and perhaps a couple more.  Tigger remains timeless, showing virtually no sign of accumulating birthdays.  Skipper doesn’t have a joint on his body that is pain free.  Gimli . . . well he has a Harley and a goatee to match . . . looks pretty good too.  Does anyone know if Gringo has entered his fifth decade?  I do know that the Argentinian training program is terminal for most of us especially seeing its effect on the one who developed it.

There are some younger ones . . . yes.  The kids and the kids, aside from Ruperts commitment aversion, seem fairly good with the last reduction in the President’s Challenge.  And maybe in reality, this is simply a dose of 50 + years of reality hitting hard.  I don’t know.

SOOOOOOOOOO . . . . .

I am prepared to throw down one last effort at making the PC palatable to all of you old farts.  The young bucks can do this with ease and perhaps inspire the rest of us to reach a bit farther as well.

  • Whereas these and other circumstances constitute the current reality of an aging runner’s club;
  • Whereas there seems to be a general lack of grass roots response to the 1st and 2nd readings of the President’s Challenge;
  • Whereas the cost of the Gulf Coast clean up will likely impact our gas prices adversely . . . at some point;
  • Whereas the early morning noise of socks being pulled up over hairy legs, is a sleep deterrent to at least one of the wives of the 6AM’ers;
  • Whereas, coming to coffee dressed up like you ran, actually constitutes a run equal to half of what you would have run . . . if you had actually run;
  • Whereas coming late and leaving early, although unverifiable, also constitutes a 1 count in the monthly totals;
  • Whereas coming to St. Timothy’s, in and around the time that runners would converge on our early morning edifice, is important for the health and longevity of the group;
  • Whereas the motto of the group has recently changed from, “6AM Runners . . . not to fast . . . not to slow . . . half fast.” . . . to . . . “6AM Runners . . . running is optional and coffee is mandatory.”;
  • Whereas, the President, in life transition and exodus from pastoral ministry, has a little more time to waste on this kind of stupid stuff;

Be it therefore resolved once more that the President’s Challenge be further reduced to 12 times* a month.

Now if any of you continue to struggle with this, let’s just pretend that it is going to work for  you.  Pick up the oven mitt that I have thrown down and in the spirit of all that is feminine, rise to this “not-real-challenging” challenge.

I love you . . .

May God bless us every one . . .

President Warthog

*12 times a month is the reasonable suggestion of Johnnie O

Advertisements

President Throws Down Smaller Gauntlet

June 17, 2010

Okay . . . so Johnnie O., Tigger and Dexter were out today.  Dexter chased a terrified squirrel up the backstop in the ballpark . . . this squirrel narrowly escaped with his life.

When Dexter is not out in the morning, this is Tigger’s job.  He didn’t get the squirrel today but he got a raven yesterday . . . nailed him.  On the way to Woodstock I think . . . the raven was either sick, stupid or arrogant, all potentially fatal.  There is a dent in the grill of Tigger’s new car, to commemorate this rare occurrence.

Oh yes . . . Skipper showed for coffee around 7:00a when we were all leaving. Sorry Steve.

So . . . on my run today, I was doing math in my head and talking to God.  Perhaps I was a bit over zealous when I put yesterday’s challenge at 20 times a month.  Today, . . . out of pure concern for the rest of you, I have decided to reduce the size of the gauntlet and suggest that our target should be . . . ummm . . . let me see . . . let’s say 16 times a month without prejudice to distance covered.

So that’s my final offer . . . unless my run/prayer time produces something additional tomorrow.


Four Day a Week Half Marathon Training Schedule

January 16, 2009

A number of you have asked that I post a generalized training schedule for the half marathon. The following is such a schedule, but I would like to make a few points.

First of all, if you do embark on this program you will note that under the heading Yazoo Training I indicated that you run 800 meters at a “designated pace with a one minute break” (and it must be EXACTLY one minute). I am willing to work with you to establish the pace, but generally speaking the pace is the same as your anticipated marathon time. in other words if you hope to do a marathon in 3 and a half hours your pace for 800 meters will be 3 minutes and 30 seconds. To determine this pace, you can take your anticipated half marathon time, double it and add 10 to 15%.

Next, the Hill repeats is based upon the use of a treadmill. In fact, during the winter I would recommend a treadmill, but ONLY for the purposes of Hill training. This avoids the possibility of sustaining injuries due to slippage. However, when the weather improves you can move outside and there you do the same number of repeats as levels. Remember, a repeat is running up a 6 to 8% hill for 2 minutes and 15 seconds and then returning to the bottom of the hill for a repeat. In Fredericton, Hanson Street is one of the best hills to practice this on.

Sunday Yazoo Training

Monday Strength Training

Tuesday Tempo at Pace faster than race pace

Wednesday Strength Training

Thursday Hills

Repeats – On the Treadmill

Friday Long Slow Distance

Saturday Day Off or Easy!!!! Cross Training

3 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

40 minute run – 1 x 10 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 4 and back

75 minutes

 

4 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

40 minute run – 2 x 5-10 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 5 and back

80 minutes

 

5 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

50 minute run – 2 x 10 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 6 and back

90 minutes

 

6 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

50 minute run – 2 x 10 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 7 and back

105 minutes

 

6 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

60 minute run – 2 x 10-15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 8 and back

110 minutes

 

7 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

50 minute run – 2 x 10 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 7 and back

115 minutes

 

8 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

50 minute run – 2 x 10-15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 6 and back

120 minutes

 

7 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each e

 

60 minute run – 2 x 15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 7 and back

95 minutes

 

6 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

50 minute run – 2 x 15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 8 and back

110 minutes

 

7 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

50 minute run – 2 x 15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 7 and back

120 minutes

 

8 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

50 minute run – 2 x 15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 6 and back

130 minutes

 

7 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

50 minute run – 2 x 15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 7 and back

120 minutes

 

8 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

50 minute run – 2 x 15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 6 and back

135 minutes

 

7 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

60 minute run – 1 x 15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 5 and back

Taper Begins120 minutes

 

4 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

25 minute run – 1 x 15 minute tempo

 

1 minute up to level 4 and back

75 minutes

 

2 Repeats of 800 meters at designated pace with one minute break between each

 

No Tempo Run – 25 minute easy run

 

1 minute up to level 3 and back

60 minutes

 

Race Day

12.06 Celebrate

 

 

 

 

 


WINTER RUNNING – WHAT TO WEAR?

December 1, 2008

Well the time has come to discuss what clothing one might consider wearing during the upcoming months where the temperature will most likely dip to extreme temperatures.  We should at all times be aware of the Norwegian Proverb; -THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A BAD WINTER … ONLY BAD CLOTHING.

In discussing this topic, regardless of the degree (pardon the pun) that one is impacted by the cold, the clothing we wear should repel external moisture, allow the body to breath, provide insulating qualities and not be an impediment to motion.  Generally speaking, the clothing one wears should be layered so as to take into account the type of exercise one is undertaking (in the case of running, of course that is continuous, relatively long durations of medium to high work rate) and of course the environmental conditions that might be encountered (including such things as precipitation, temperature, wind conditions and so forth).

EXTERNAL LAYER – TORSOE 

In the opinion of this author, the most important thing to be considered is how to keep moisture away from the body.  Moisture comes in two forms, from within and from without.  While it is fairly obvious what the external source of moisture is, the less obvious, at least to the uninitiated is that despite how cold it may be, when we exercise, we perspire.  This fact requires us to replenish our system with fluids and this of course allows for even more perspiration.  What may be good to prevent the body from getting wet as a result of external factors may not be good at allowing the perspiration to escape.  A lot of research has gone into developing “smart clothing” that allows for the body to breath and at the same time protect it from the environment.  If you are in the process of considering your needs then an outer layer in the form of an un-insulated jacket that is both water resistant and permeable is an absolute must.  This jacket should not be skin tight, but rather relatively loosely fitted. 

HEAD 

We have all heard our mothers tell us to keep a hat on.  Well as difficult as it may seem, she was right.  We loose more heat from the top of our head when it is exposed that we do from any other part of the body.  In the opinion of this author, a hat is not an option when the temperature is below minus 5 Celsius.  Again the hat should allow for the perspiration to “wick out” but at the same time it should provide some insulation.  Again a lot of research has gone into the development of very good hats, but let me suggest that you not overlook the simple woolen toque.  Wool is a fabric that keeps the heat of the body despite being wet. 

INSULATION LAYER -TORSOE 

Underneath the external layer, you need some insulation.  Unlike the jacket, the insulating layer(s) are typically fitted closer to the skin.  I have indicated the possibility of there being more than one layer and in this case the layer closest to the skin should allow for maximum breathability (Lifa underwear or Under Armour gaments are great).  The layers between the skin layer and the jacket actually provide for the insulation and are typically thicker, but still must allow for wicking.  Remember it is the outer layer that provides protection from the elements. 

FOOT GEAR 

The age-old question is what to wear on your feet while running.  For 25 years I wore the same shoes that I ran in during the summer, but in the last couple of years I have benefitted from purchasing Trail Shoes or Winter Shoes.  Not only are they a little more rugged and provide some insulating effect for the feet, they provide better traction in the sometimes very slippery conditions.  An alternative that some runners find very useful is to run in regular shoes, but to use traction devises on the bottom of your feet to reduce slippage.  I have not gone to that length, but I have spoken to many who have and they are convinced that this is the way to go.  Whatever you do keep in mind that you should try to both keep your feet warm and get a little extra traction so as to avoid injuries. 

HANDS 

One of the sure fire ways to get cold is to not protect your hands.  It is generally accepted that if your hands are cold, your body is cold.  So, wear something, even if it is an old pair of socks (in a pinch) to keep your hands warm, and your body will thank you. 

PROTECTING YOUR FACE 

We have seen people wearing all sorts of things over their faces.  In fact some of the articles that I have seen would get most people arrested if they were to step into a bank with it on.  Personally, while I accept the requirement to keep the face warm and protected, especially when the wind is blowing, I have seldom if ever have put anything over my face, because when it does get cold enough I find that a runner’s best friend (Vaseline) works better than anything else and it also keeps your face moist.  My suggestion is give it a try. 

CONCLUSION 

Running this winter can actually be enjoyed if you follow some of these simple rules.  So get out and wait to hear the crunch of freshly fallen snow under your feet as you take on the elements.